Railroad

Post

Santa Fe Railroad Depot

Where Post, Texas sits today was cereal manufacturer Charles W. Post’s second location for his proposed model town (see Close City).  It was the second only due to its geographical location near the center of Garza County – the state legislature’s preferred location for the seats of county government.  Post is situated just below the rim of the Caprock Escarpment of the Llano Estacado, which forms the southeastern boundary of the Great Plains.  This area of Texas had long been the buffalo-hunting grounds of the Plains Indian tribes.  The Indian’s removal by the U. S. Army in the 1870s allowed cattle ranchers to safely pasture their herds.  For thirty years after its creation by the state legislature, citizens in Garza County were vastly outnumbered by livestock.

In 1906 C. W. Post began purchasing ranches in Garza and Lynn counties, ultimately totaling 225,000 acres, most of which was subdivided into 160-acre parcels.  Post platted a townsite in 1907 and began construction his social experiment, the town of Post City.  He established the Double U. Company to manage construction of the town as well as its promotion and lot sales.  Part of the effort to attract land purchasers included lining the streets with trees and prohibiting alcoholic beverages and prostitution.  Post City’s first post office was housed in a tent, as were many of the town’s businesses while they waited for buildings to be completed. In addition to houses, the Double U. Company built the Algerita Hotel, cotton gin, and a textile manufacturing plant – Postex Cotton Mills.  By 1910, when the Santa Fe Railroad arrived, a bank and a school had been built and the town’s first newspaper had started publication – the Post City Post.

Another experimental effort of C. W. Post to increase the value of his land was rainmaking.  Explosives, attached to kites that were tethered to towers atop the escarpment, were detonated in the atmosphere at timed intervals.  And while rainfall frequently occurred after the explosions, it was never determined whether the explosions caused the rain or not.

The town of Post, Texas – with a population of 1,000 people – was incorporated in 1914, which was also the year that Charles W. Post died.  By 1916, after an extensive real estate campaign, Post and the surrounding area contained approximately 3,000 inhabitants and 14 private corporations which together held over 1.2 million dollars in capital stock.  That year the town, with financial support from Post’s estate, made an unsuccessful bid to become the site of West Texas Agricultural and Mechanical College, which would later become Texas Tech University.  The town continued to grow, even through the Great Depression and Dust Bowl years.  Postex Cotton Mills was sold to Ely and Walker Dry Goods Company of St. Louis in 1945.  At the time of its sale, it employed 375 workers who produced over six million yards of cloth each year.  The mill, now owned by Burlington Industries, has remained the town’s largest employer.

Santa Fe Railroad Depot – This was one of four stations in Texas designed by Kansas City architect Louis Curtiss between 1909 and 1911.  Reinforced concrete was used for the structure and the architectural ornamentation.  The depot has been restored by the Post Chamber of Commerce.

REFERENCE:  Paul M. Lucko, “POST, TX,” Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/hgp10), accessed April 06, 2015. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.

Teague

Teague Hotel

Teague is at the junction of U.S. Highway 84, State Highway 179, and Farm roads 80 and 145, nine miles southwest of Fairfield in western Freestone County. The area was first settled around the time of the Civil War. During the latter half of the nineteenth century a small community known as Brewer, grew up at the site.  When the Trinity and Brazos Valley Railway was built through the county in 1906, it located its machine and car shops at the site.  The town, renamed Teague after Betty Teague, niece of railroad magnate Benjamin Franklin Yoakum, was incorporated in 1906.

Benjamin Franklin Yoakum, railroad executive, was born near Tehuacana, Texas, in Limestone County on August 20, 1859, the son of Narcissa (Teague) and Franklin L. Yoakum. At age twenty he became a rodman and chain bearer in a railroad surveying gang, laying the International-Great Northern Railroad into Palestine, Texas.  He later became a land boomer and immigration agent for the Jay Gould Lines. He drilled artesian wells and brought European immigrants from New York to farm the land of the Trans-Mississippi and Rio Grande valley.  In 1886 he became traffic manager of the San Antonio and Aransas Pass Railway.  In 1887 the town of Yoakum, Texas, was named for him. In 1889 he was promoted to general manager of the railways, and in 1890 he became receiver.  For three years he was general manager and third vice president of the Gulf, Colorado and Santa Fe.  In 1897 he became general manager of the Frisco (St. Louis and San Francisco Railway Company).  Under him the lines grew from 1,200 to 6,000 miles.  In 1905 the Frisco and Rock Island lines were joined, and Yoakum was the chairman of the executive committee.  This line was known as the Yoakum Line and at the time was the largest railroad system under a single control.  His career was one of the most colorful of the many men in railroad history.  He knew each branch of work: engineering, traffic, operating, and finance.  In his later years he became very interested in the farm problem.  He was an advocate of an agricultural cooperative society, growing and marketing farm products to reduce the spread between farm and consumer.  It is said that his genius made Hidalgo and Cameron counties into agricultural communities. In 1907 Yoakum moved to New York, where he had a farm in Farmingdale, Long Island.  He became president and later chairman of the board of the Empire Board and Mortgage Company.

The community served as a shipping center for area cotton farmers and grew rapidly. By 1914 it had Baptist, Catholic, Disciples of Christ, Methodist, Episcopal, Methodist Episcopal, and Presbyterian churches, as well as public schools, waterworks, an electric light plant, an ice plant, three banks, two cotton gins, a cottonseed oil mill, a cotton compress, the Teague Daily News, two weekly newspapers, and a population of 3,300. Teague continued to prosper during the 1920s.

The onset of the Great Depression and plummeting cotton prices, however, began a slow decline that continued until the 1980s. The number of businesses dropped from 140 in 1931 to 100 in 1936. After World War II many other stores and businesses closed, and by the early 1980s only forty-six rated businesses remained. The town also witnessed a decline in population during the same period; it reached a low of some 2,800 in 1975. After the mid-1980s, however, the population grew steadily, and in 1990 Teague had 3,268 residents. The population was 4,557 in 2000. The area has large coal, lignite, sand, and clay deposits. In recent years natural gas production has become an important industry.

REFERENCE:  Christopher Long, “TEAGUE, TX,” Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/hgt04), accessed July 28, 2013. Published by the Texas State Historical Association;  Mary M. Orozco-Vallejo, “YOAKUM, BENJAMIN FRANKLIN,” Handbook of Texas Online(http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fyo01), accessed July 30, 2013. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.

Loraine

Originally established in the early 1880s as a cotton and cattle shipping point on the Texas and Pacific Railway, Loraine saw little development in its early years. A post office opened there in 1890, and a school was built in 1893.  A hotel, a grocery, and a hardware store reportedly operated at the site before 1905.  In that year Parson Crandall bought the townsite land from the railroad and platted the town.

Growth was rapid after the town was platted.  A weekly newspaper began publication there in 1906, and the community was incorporated by 1910.  In 1914, when its population was an estimated 800, Loraine supported more than forty retail and service businesses, including a bank, a commercial club, and an electric utility company.  During the 1920s Loraine had an aldermanic form of government, operated its own public water system, and provided both high school and grade school facilities to local students.  In the 1930s cotton ginning grew in importance, and the town was recognized as a shipping, marketing, and ginning center.

Population estimates for Loraine ranged between 700 and 750 during this period.  A hospital was opened at the community in 1938.  During the 1940s the town was known for its cheese factory, for its annual dairy show, and as the headquarters for the Loraine Cooperative Association, which handled the milk supply for several surrounding counties.  The number of businesses at Loraine varied from an estimated high of fifty-five in 1940 to a low of thirty-four in 1947.  Population estimates remained at around 700 in the 1940s but rose to more than 1,000 during the 1950s, though the number of businesses began a steady decline.

Loraine is on U.S. Highway 20/80, Farm Road 644, and the Missouri Pacific line, ten miles east of Colorado City and fifty-eight miles west of Abilene in northeastern Mitchell County.  Three conflicting stories concerning the town’s name exist: the first says that Loraine was named for a railroad official’s wife, the second that the community was named for the daughter or wife (possibly Loraine Crandall) of a local landowner, and the third that the town was named for the French region of Lorraine.

REFERENCE:  Patricia L. Duncan, “LORAINE, TX,” Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/hll60), accessed July 08, 2012. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.