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Lost, Texas

Vanishing Texas Architectural Heritage

Category / West Texas

Snyder – Update

In 1911 the Santa Fe Railroad opened a passenger and freight depot in Snyder – one of four Santa Fe depots designed by Kansas City architect, Louis S. Curtis, in the Art Moderne style. The identical depots were built within two years of each other in Sweetwater, Post and Lubbock. The buildings’ reinforced-concrete frame featured […]

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Shafter

Shafter Silver Mine The history of Shafter is closely tied to silver mining. There is evidence that the Spaniards prospected for valuable ores in the area during the early 1600s, but Shafter became a mining town only after September 1880, when John W. Spencer, a freighter turned prospector, found silver ore there. Spencer showed an […]

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Mentone

Mentone Community Church As the only town in Loving County, Mentone has been dubbed the Smallest County Seat in Texas.  The Community Church (above) is one of only five to six non-residential buildings in the town.  The church was moved to Mentone in 1930 after the Pecos River flooded nearby Porterville destroying the town.  This […]

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Marfa Redoux

There is a part of Marfa’s history that is very different from the current hip, artsy place most people think of when they hear the name.  Back in 1911, the Mexican Revolution was underway.  Fearing that Mexican troops might attack across the border, the U.S. government sent cavalry troops to Presidio County to protect its […]

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Wink

Named for Col. C. M. Winkler, famed Texas Confederate soldier, Winkler County was originally settled by Comanche Indians who ruled the area until 1874.  Cattle ranching was the economic driver of the county until 1926, when oil was discovered by Roy Westbrook on the Hendrick Ranch.  The Hendrick Oilfield transformed Winkler County almost overnight. By […]

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